Snow Leopard

Backing up Snow Leopard Server with mlbackups

Apple‘s Snow Leopard Server product is one lovely implementation of UNIX. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed using it for the power and simplicity that it offers. I’ve loved using Apple’s operating systemsthanks to the combination of UNIX power and elegant design. Snow Leopard server is no exception to this rule. The barrier to entry with Snow Leopard server was lowered when Apple reduced the price of the product to $499 USD and offered an unlimited client version only.

Fixing Mangled Contact Labels on iPhone

<dd class="wp-caption-dd zemanta-img-attribution" style="font-size: 0.8em;"> Image via <a href="http://www.crunchbase.com">CrunchBase</a> </dd> </dl> A coworker sent this along. I’ve had this issue on a few contacts and didn’t really have time to delve into it. Name removed to protect the innocent and good intentions. Be very careful with this and make sure you have a backup of all data that you plan to manipulate. —

Quick Safari/Snow Leopard Tip

If you’re having stupid amounts of trouble with your plugins loading in Safari4 on Snow Leopard, go to your Finderand open /Applications. Right-click on the Safari app and choose “Get Info.” On that screen, you’ll see a checkboxto run the app in 32-bit mode. Check that. Restart Safari if it’s open. Now you’ll find that your plugins magically work. I guess this whole 64-bit thing has caught developers with their pants down.

Scaling Guidance

<dd class="wp-caption-dd zemanta-img-attribution" style="font-size: 0.8em;"> Image via <a href="http://www.crunchbase.com">CrunchBase</a> </dd> </dl> At WWDC2009, I stood up in a session on Snow Leopardserver and lightly rattled Apple‘s cage about its poor scaling guidance for the product. They were spending a great deal of time talking about the benefits of Wiki Server2, but there was little to take away from the session on what to tell any prospective customers regarding cost.